AHRC & ACJ hold a Joint Law Enforcement- Community Zoom Meeting Addressing the Rise of Hate and the Targeting of Asian Americans: 

By AmericaAmerican Human Rights Council (AHRC-USA)
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The American Human Rights Council (AHRC-USA) and the American Citizens for Justice (ACJ) held a zoom call discussion on April 6, 2021 in response to the rapidly growing anti-Asian hate and the increase in hate incidents, hate crimes and mass shootings in America. The discussion’s topics included these two questions: What is a hate crime? Are agencies quick to dismiss racism as a motive?

Over fifty- eight invited guests and leaders attended this discussion. Participants included member and leaders from the Arab and Muslim American community, the Latino American community, the African American community and the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. The meeting hosted Ms. Saima Mohsen, Acting US Attorney, and her team; Mr. Tim Waters, SAC FBI and his team, and Mr. Vance Callendar, SAC of ICE-DHS and his team.

Community leaders stressed the importance of the government signaling zero tolerance of hate crime. This can be achieved with aggressive prosecution of hate crimes. Leaders affirmed that the diverse communities of Michigan stand in complete solidarity with the Asian American community. Law enforcement officials emphasized the top priority the government gives to prosecuting hate crime.

Leaders pledged to continue this important constructive discussion and engagement among themselves and with the law enforcement agencies at the local, state and federal level.

AHRC salutes law enforcement agencies at all levels, local, state and federal, for their professionalism and vigilance in protecting America’s diverse communities. AHRC urges all not to take the challenge of the rise of hate and violence lightly. AHRC urges the public to report all suspicious activity to law enforcement agencies by calling 911 or by calling 1-800 CALL- FBI.

“The community conversation with law enforcement is a great example of collaboration between the Asian American community and the Arab American community,” said attorney Roland Hwang, ACJ President. “ACJ thanks AHRC for joining us and leading the conversation,” concluded Hwang.

“Bias is a human weakness, education is the key to fighting bias and prejudice,” said Imam Steve Elturk, AHRC Founding Member & IONA Imam. “Collaborative efforts on the part of law enforcement agencies, clergy, community leaders, teachers, among others- ongoing and organized, help to educate and raise awareness,” concluded Elturk.

“AHRC facilitated a very constructive meeting between law enforcement and community leaders to address the rising hate crimes directed towards Asian Americans and other minority groups” said civil rights attorney Shereef Akeel, AHRC Advisory Board member. “We should continue to focus on the victims rather than on the perpetrators, as it is the strongest remedy to unite communities of all ethnicities and faiths to combat hate,” continued Akeel.

“If all communities of color and allies unite in solidarity, we will defeat racism and white supremacy,” said attorney Lily Cheng-Schulting, Human Rights and Disability Rights Community Advocate.

“We don’t see hate directed at the AAPI community as an Asian American problem, we see it as an American problem,” said Imad Hamad, AHRC Executive Director. “We take ownership of this problem and we see all Americans from all backgrounds as part of the solution,” added Hamad. “No one should remain silent, we are proud allies of the AAPI community,” concluded Hamad.