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Senile Dementia

Senile Dementia seems very common among the elderly lately. My mother is only 74yrs old. Before her condition began to manifest, she was sociable, warm and lively. She had retired in her fifties from teaching and went on to become a church worker.

As an ordained layreader in the church, mother was very active physically and mentally. For nearly two decades, she lead severall women organisations in the church. She could never be described as withdrawn or lonely.

With a dotting husband and four adorable sons - all married with children, mother had everything going as planned for her or so it seemed. The only sources of worry to her was; first, she suffered the misfortune of losing two daughters. Second, she got operated for cataract, a very serious eye condition. However, about three years ago, mother started behaving funny. Dad, being the closest to her, bore the brunt.

Simply put, mother started to lose her mind. Mother was an epitome of a respectful wife and loving mother before dementia set in. Her violence tendencies soon got worse and we had to seek medical solution and support. Presently, mothers condition is stable but, the agonizing part in having and elderly loved one who suffers from dementia, is their inability to recognise anyone anymore.

Not even their own children nor grandchildren. Same for other family members. In fact, everyone is a total stranger. Mother ask me who i am every time am around to see her. The experience is like meeting a total stranger. The first time i experienced her lack of recognition for me, i cried like a child.


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Articles by Christian Chinedu

Uknown adviser is better than a known adviser, and he who gives good advise is the God Almighty.
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