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Rio Ferdinand: 'English Players Are Overpriced'

Source: thewillnigeria.com
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Former England captain Rio Ferdinand has questioned the value of English players in the transfer market.

Ferdinand, 36, retired from football in May and was the world’s most expensive defender when he joined Manchester United for £29.1m in 2002.

“English players are so overpriced right now it’s a joke,” he said.

However, England internationals such as James Milner and Tom Cleverley have agreed deals with Liverpool and Everton on free transfers this summer.

Defender Micah Richards also moved to Aston Villa for free, Tottenham signed full-back Kieran Trippier for £3.5m, while Burnley will be due compensation when striker Danny Ings joins Liverpool.

Meanwhile, Manchester United have been linked with a £50m move for 21-year-old Tottenham striker Harry Kane this summer, and Manchester City have had a £40m bid rejected for Liverpool’s 20-year-old Raheem Sterling. The Reds value the forward at £50m.

Kane has scored 36 goals in 77 appearances for Spurs – including 31 last season – while Sterling has played 124 games for Liverpool.

Ferdinand feels foreign players such as Manchester City striker Sergio Aguero and Arsenal forward Alexis Sanchez represent better value by saying on Twitter: “Aguero £38m and Sanchez £32m.”

Andy Carroll remains the most expensive British player signed by a British club, after Liverpool paid Newcastle £35m for the striker in January 2011. He played just 46 Premier League games for the Reds, scoring six goals.

Most expensive British transfers:
Angel Di Maria is the most expensive British transfer after Manchester United paid Real Madrid £59.7m for the Argentina winger

Spain striker Fernando Torres joined Chelsea from Liverpool for £50m

Germany midfielder Mesut Ozil signed for Arsenal from Real Madrid for £42.5m

Argentina forward Sergio Aguero left Atletico Madrid for £38m to join Manchester City

Manchester United paid Chelsea £37.1m for Spain midfielder Juan Mata

BBC SPORTS