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LAGOS MOVES TO REDUCE LICENSING OFFICERS, MOTORISTS' FRICTION

By NBF News
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Frequent friction between licensing officers and motorists on Lagos roads are expected to reduce drastically after a two-day workshop held by the Lagos State Motor Vehicle Administration Agency for the officers.

The workshop, according to a statement obtained on Tuesday, was a part of the efforts of the agency to promote mutual relationship with its clients.

The Permanent Secretary of the agency, Mr. Akin Hanson, said the aim of the workshop was to change the attitude of the personnel towards its target audience.

Declaring the workshop open, he asserted that it was important to expose the officers to work ethics and customer-care service for best results.

Hanson stressed the need for maintaining corporate reputation and simultaneously supporting the marketing of its products and services.

The permanent secretary said that the task of the agency could not be achieved without the cooperation of all workers whom he described as stakeholders.

Hanson, therefore, urged participants to make the best use of the opportunity given to them in elevating the agency to greater height.

The workshop took participants through different courses such as overview of the roles, general etiquette of front desk officers, transparency, attitudinal change at work and proper documentation, the statement added.

Meanwhile, the Rivers State Road Traffic Management Authority popularly, called TIMARIV, has alleged that its officers are being harassed.

The agency said its officials were always facing brutality in the hands of military men while carrying out their duty of ensuring easy traffic flow in Port Harcourt, the state capital.

The Chief Traffic Controller, TIMARIV, Mr. Confidence Eke, lamented that the agency had always had reasons to rush its officers to nearby hospitals while on duty as a result of the inhuman treatment by soldiers.

Eke told journalists that the situation had continued unabated with the military denying the involvement of their men.

He said, 'When they feel that they are in a hurry and should not be stopped by any traffic official, they come down from their vehicles to challenge our officials and beat them up.

'We have reported this matter to both the Army and Airforce, but nothing has been done to stop it. What they are saying is that their officials are not involved in the harassment of our workers.'