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FIRE RAZES KANTI KWARI MARKET IN KANO

By NBF News

Fire razes Kanti Kwari market in Kano
From Desmond Mgboh, Kano
Saturday, March 13, 2010
A midnight fire incident occurred in the early hours of yesterday and razed down some portions of the famous Kanti Kwari market in Kano. It destroyed valuables, mostly textile materials and other related items worth billions of naira. The tragedy made businessmen to wail in hopelessness over their losses. It started at about 1: 00 am in the night and lasted till noon. Fire fighters and volunteers battled to salvage the largest textile market in the West African Sub - region.

The fire according to Saturday Sun's investigation, affected several building complexes within the market and burnt several shops situated inside these complexes. Also affected by the inferno were the auxiliary attachments, made up of woods and planks used as petty shops. Buildings seriously affected by the fire include Gidan Labaran, Gidan Maradi, Gidan Bayajjida, Gidan Alfa, Gidan Wali, Gidan Ali, Gidan Nmadawa, Gidam Maimai, and Gidan Inuwa. Each of these buildings contained shops in hundreds. It is estimated that about 300 shops were burnt down.

The Nigeria Fire Service, Kano, and a number of private individuals have been battling the tragedy since it started last night. Among the private organizations that joined in the rescue operation include an Asian plastic firm situated in Jogana, the Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport, Kano, Dantata and Sawoe Construction Company who had sent in their trucks while a famous business man, Alhaji Saleh Hassan Hedejia provided water.

Although, the cause of the fire is yet to be ascertained, witnesses said the fire was as result of a spark from the nearby transformer belonging to the Power Holding Company. The transformer is situated in the market.

Speaking to the press, the Vice Chairman, Caretaker Committee of Kanti Kwari Traders Association, Alhaji Kabiru Sarki Sakagi said the fire could have been contained if fire service men had enough water when they started the operations.