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BAYELSA DEMANDS JOINT OWNERSHIP OF PETROLEUM RESOURCES,BAYELSA DEMANDS JOINT OWNERSHIP OF PETROLEUM RESOURCES,

By Bayelsa State
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Bayelsa State Government has advocated for inclusion of joint ownership of petroleum resources in the long awaited Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) before the National Assembly.

The State Commissioner for Energy, Bar. Francis Ikio advocated this while presenting the State Government's position on the bill, to a joint committee of the Senate and the House of Representatives at the National Assembly complex in Abuja.He stated on behalf of the Government that section two of the proposedbill, which vests ownership rights entirely on the Federal Government, does

not recognize the customary rights of the host communities and the host

states bearing the crude oil and gas, hence the section should be recoined

to accord joint ownership rights to the Federal Government, host states and

host communities.
Bayelsa government has also opposed section 3 of the bill, which gives

exclusive powers to the Federal Government to allocate revenues derived

from petroleum resources to the other tiers of government, arguing that the

Federal Government cannot have power to allocate revenues from resources

naturally deposited in the host states and host communities. It therefore,

demanded that the said section should be expunged.
On environment, the State Government has expressed reservation about the

inadequacy of provisions that will lead to effective legal framework to

manage degradation of the environment, including communal participation,

regretting also that the bill has no provision to remediate the

environment, which has been devastated more than five decades ago, without

proper management.
Thus, the Government has demanded that section 200(5) and section 202 (1)

of the bill, should be amended to include consultation of host communities

to ascertain the environmental plan of companies before they are granted

license for exploration of crude oil and gas.
Speaking further on environmental damage, Bar. Ikio said the position of

the Bayelsa State government is that, September 30, 2014 should be

stipulated as the deadline to end gas flare in the oil producing

communities.
Learning lesson from the Federal Government's delay in compensating Ogoni

as ruled by the International Court of Justice in Hague, the Bayelsa

Government has called for full adoption of the Hydrocarbon Pollution

Restoration Project (HYPREP) and the United Nations Environmental Programme

(UNEP) in petroleum pollution sites in impacted communities.

It equally demanded for a Federal for section in the bill to compel oil and gas companies to

locate their head offices at their host states, deploring that for more

than five decades, multinational oil and gas companies were yet to site

headquarters in Bayelsa, which has sustained the industry with large oil

and gas supplies.
Earlier, the State Government, urged the National Assembly to consult

widely at the grassroots, where the impact of oil and gas exploration is

worst in order to get more inputs before the bill is passed into law.

The commissioner stated that the demand by the state was imperative,

because the extant Petroleum Act of 1969, which was enacted by the

military, without inputs from the people, was one of the major causes of

the deprivation and underdevelopment of the Niger delta region.

Bayelsa State Government has advocated for inclusion of joint ownership of petroleum resources in the long awaited Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) before the National Assembly.

The State Commissioner for Energy, Bar. Francis Ikio advocated this while presenting the State Government's position on the bill, to a joint committee of the Senate and the House of Representatives at the National Assembly complex in Abuja.He stated on behalf of the Government that section two of the proposedbill, which vests ownership rights entirely on the Federal Government, does

not recognize the customary rights of the host communities and the host

states bearing the crude oil and gas, hence the section should be recoined

to accord joint ownership rights to the Federal Government, host states and

host communities.
Bayelsa government has also opposed section 3 of the bill, which gives

exclusive powers to the Federal Government to allocate revenues derived

from petroleum resources to the other tiers of government, arguing that the

Federal Government cannot have power to allocate revenues from resources

naturally deposited in the host states and host communities. It therefore,

demanded that the said section should be expunged.
On environment, the State Government has expressed reservation about the

inadequacy of provisions that will lead to effective legal framework to

manage degradation of the environment, including communal participation,

regretting also that the bill has no provision to remediate the

environment, which has been devastated more than five decades ago, without

proper management.
Thus, the Government has demanded that section 200(5) and section 202 (1)

of the bill, should be amended to include consultation of host communities

to ascertain the environmental plan of companies before they are granted

license for exploration of crude oil and gas.
Speaking further on environmental damage, Bar. Ikio said the position of

the Bayelsa State government is that, September 30, 2014 should be

stipulated as the deadline to end gas flare in the oil producing

communities.
Learning lesson from the Federal Government's delay in compensating Ogoni

as ruled by the International Court of Justice in Hague, the Bayelsa

Government has called for full adoption of the Hydrocarbon Pollution

Restoration Project (HYPREP) and the United Nations Environmental Programme

(UNEP) in petroleum pollution sites in impacted communities.

It equally demanded for a Federal for section in the bill to compel oil and gas companies to

locate their head offices at their host states, deploring that for more

than five decades, multinational oil and gas companies were yet to site

headquarters in Bayelsa, which has sustained the industry with large oil

and gas supplies.
Earlier, the State Government, urged the National Assembly to consult

widely at the grassroots, where the impact of oil and gas exploration is

worst in order to get more inputs before the bill is passed into law.

The commissioner stated that the demand by the state was imperative,

because the extant Petroleum Act of 1969, which was enacted by the

military, without inputs from the people, was one of the major causes of

the deprivation and underdevelopment of the Niger delta region.