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The Lighter Side Of The President's Address … 'Who Said Tweaa' ?

By Ghanaian Chronicle

The State of Nations Address presented by President John Mahama, aside its serious details to salvage the country from the quagmire of economic difficulties, also had artistic and comical aspects to it.

The now popular word in town "Tweaa", had a good representation in the august house, when the president, in his usual sense of humour, took the house by surprise, when he jokingly retorted: "order! Are you my co-equal," in apparent response to heckling from members of the minority.

The minority members had found an ingenious way of using the 'Tweaa' word in the legislative house, which word had earlier been declared unparliamentary and banned from the house.

The automatic response from the minority, whenever President Mahama flaunted his achievements on the floor of parliament, was a deafening "Tweaa".

In trying to serve the minority in good comical measure, the president asked the expected question -"who said Tweaa"? And this threw the house into a state of uncontrollable laughter.

The State of Nations Address is the second by President John Dramani Mahama after taking over as president of the republic of Ghana.

The use of the word 'tweaa' has come up for a determination by the Speaker of the house, whether its use in parliament was parliamentary or not. The Speaker had issued a fatwa against its usage on the floor of the house.

But yesterday, the President got into his element as a former member of the House when he seemingly defied that order and used the word.

His approach to delivering his state of the nation's address has been described as a lighthearted approach to delivering very serious issues.

The president made mention of the contribution of the Arts and tourism industry towards the development of the country, and the creation of jobs in the creative arts industry.

According to the president, his government is committed towards providing enabling environment for the private sector to thrive.

In promoting made in Ghana products and services, he recommended a shoe made in Ghana to the house, which he wore to deliver his address. His resplendent 'agbada' was also a statement for local fashion and apparel.

President Mahama has initiated the campaign of "Buy Made in Ghana" to encourage Ghanaians to patronize local products. His Excellency announced few concrete measures of a new sugar processing factory in Komenda, to support the local demand and reduce imports.

BY CHRIS TWUM,